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Archive for the ‘green printing’ Category

Green Printing Deserves Eco-friendly Binding

Monday, September 26th, 2011

What is the most eco-friendly binding method for your green printing project? There are several ways to bind a book or booklet, and your green printer can produce most of them in-house. Perfect binding, otherwise known as paperback book binding, involves gluing the pages into a book block and then wrapping a pre-scored paper cover around the pages. Case binding for creating a hardback book is similar, except that the cover is made by wrapping a pre-printed sheet around cover and spine boards prior to binding. Wire “spiral” or “twin-loop” binding can also be accomplished with plastic, but because we try to avoid the use of plastic in our operation, this is not one of the services we offer. The most common binding method for smaller publications is saddle-stitching, which is accomplished by creating staples from a roll of unfinished wire.

So which is the best binding for your earth-friendly publication? Taking plastic coil out of the picture, it’s pretty much a toss-up, depending mainly on the intended purpose of the book. Perfect binding uses only non-toxic glue to make a book. Case binding involves the use of boards which are made from heavy, recycled, unbleached chipboard. While many people do like to laminate their hardback covers, this does protect the books for a lifetime with proper care. Saddle-binding uses a minimum of material – about 2 inches of unfinished 24 gauge wire. The wire twin-loop method uses the most material of all the binding methods, but the wire is partially recycled, and there is no coating on it. This is a great way to bind a journal or any book that needs to stay perfectly flat when open.

Print your book, newsletter or magazine on 100% post-consumer recycled paper with either soy inks, or our organic, non-toxic digital ink, then pick the binding method that best suits the intended use of the project. Barefoot Press will handle the job from start to finish under one roof, assuring that the product meets our high standards for both production quality and low environmental impact.

Smoother folds keep quality high on recycled papers

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

Who spends over $10,000 to make a prettier crease on a piece of paper? Well, apparently we do. Green printing is just the beginning of our process – finishing is every bit as important to assuring a quality result. We’ve always done a good job with scoring, but when we saw what a real knife-and-die crease looked like, we had to have it in our bindery. So we made the commitment to a Morgana Auto-Creaser.

A traditional score is accomplished using a wheel and collar on a set of roller shafts. The idea is to break the fibers of the sheet and stretch the paper so that when the fold is made, the sheet doesn’t crack. This is usually sufficient, but occasionally even a scored paper shows some cracking, especially when there is solid ink crossing the fold or the paper is folding against the grain. Other factors such as high post-consumer recycled content and digital printing only make the problem worse. Further, because it is guided by a side guide down the edge of the sheet, the accuracy of a score is never quite perfect enough for us.

The Morgana, on the other hand, creates a perfectly smooth crease using a male and female die, and a lot of pressure. This forms a precise valley that looks like a miniature book spine. Even when creasing heavy recycled card stock across the grain, there is virtually no cracking. The machine uses electronic eyes to precisely stop the sheet at each crease location, and the results are incredibly accurate.

We could have bought a Harley, but we’re just geeky enough that the Creaser seemed more appealing. After using the machine for less than a month, Andrew, our bindery manager, commented that he really didn’t know what we did before acquiring it. Not only have we eliminated our scoring issues, the Creaser makes all of our subsequent operations trouble-free. The folder flies through jobs with critical color breaks, and the booklet-maker never misses exacting cross-overs.

Obviously we are committed to very high quality standards, and we think we should continue to invest in our process, even when the economy gets tough. Our work demands precision and our customers deserve it. So next time you pick up a printed job, take a close look at the folding. Then stop in and ask us for a demonstration of our new Morgana Auto-Creaser.

Green Printer Eliminates Wastewater

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

We are happy to report another step toward sustainable, green printing has been finalized here at Barefoot Press. We reported earlier on our transition to process-free Fuji plates. The plates are in full production and it was one of the easiest transitions we have made.

As I was filling out a waste-water survey form for the City of Raleigh the other day, I realized that with this move, we have totally eliminated all waste-water from our process! The only water that goes down a drain at our plant is in the bathroom. Green Printing can’t get much more eco-friendly than this.

Barefoot Press founder nominated for Environmental Leadership Award

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010

Richard Kilby, President of Barefoot Press – a pioneer in eco-friendly printing in Raleigh, NC – has been nominated for the William D. Schaeffer Environmental Award.

Created in 1990, the award honors Dr. William Schaeffer and his many contributions to environmental research, compliance education, and advocacy in the printing industry. According to the Printing Industries of America website: “The Schaeffer Award serves to recognize an individual’s focus on advancing environmental awareness and action in the graphic communications industry as a whole. A candidate’s accomplishments should go above and beyond job requirements or display an unselfish contribution to the industry not solely for a particular organization’s commercial gain. The ongoing environmental advocacy of Dr. Schaffer typifies the leadership activities expected of award recipients. Individuals must have sustained long-term efforts (on the order of several years or more) that have resulted in successful environmental programs and improvements.”

Barefoot Press was founded in 1987 in order to promote recycled papers and green printing practices. The company has pursued it’s agenda of educating customers and the general public about the benefits of eco-friendly printing for some 23 years. Mr. Kilby’s nomination is a recognition of those ongoing efforts.

Process-free plates make green printing more efficient

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

We are happy to confirm that another step toward sustainable printing has been accomplished here at Barefoot Press. We reported earlier on our transition to process-free Fuji plates. Well, the plates are now in full production and everything went like clockwork.

Because these plates use no water, developer, or any other chemistry, they have totally eliminated all remaining environmental issues in our prepress department. We simply laser-image the plates on our Fuji DART platesetter and hang them on the press. The plates fall into register quicker, roll up to color quicker, and so far we have had no plate remakes due to a quality issue. Because they are made from a high grade aluminum they are just as recyclable as our last plates, but have none of the waste disposal issues related to the plate processor.

We are always looking for ways to improve our eco-friendly printing process. This is a big step toward sustainability, and it wasn’t inexpensive to implement. But the results are worth the investment and effort, and we are pleased to say we have the cleanest prep department a green printer can have. We are offering demonstrations, so if you are interested please drop us a line.

Original Green Printer makes move to eliminate prepress chemistry

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The new year brings new innovation to Barefoot Press as we begin the transition to process-free plates in our pressroom. This move will eliminate all wet chemistry in our prepress department. The Fuji Ecomaxx-T plates are imaged via the laser diode banks on our Fuji DART platesetter, then go straight to press without the need for a chemical processor.

We are constantly striving to achieve a cleaner green printing process, and this is a significant step in that evolution. Our previous plates used a largely water-based process, but still required chemistry along with all of the maintenance, mess and water usage. Now, the water usage is completely eliminated and the process is totally clean and dry. We are very excited to make this move towards an even more eco-friendly printing process.

Empire Properties goes green with new business cards

Saturday, November 21st, 2009

Designer Mike Rosado of Empire Properties has selected French Muscletone 140# cover for the latest printing of the company’s business cards. This is an especially appropriate choice considering that Empire owns and manages a large number of historic commercial properties in downtown Raleigh, and this is the heaviest card stock we offer. “This business card is as thick as a brick!”

Muscletone is manufactured by your green printer’s favorite eco-friendly paper mill, French Paper Co. in Niles, MI. The mill is powered entirely by the company’s onsite hydro plant. Almost all of the papers produced at French contain 100% post-consumer recycled fiber.

We appreciate Empire’s move to green printing in their promotional materials, as well as their mission to recycle some of Raleigh’s oldest buildings into wonderful new spaces for restaurants, bars, offices and shops.

Interest in recycled labels up

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

Demand continues to grow for recycled labels. Your green printer is excited to report that we have completed several new projects on this 100% post-consumer recycled label paper. This label is uncoated (non-glossy) and prints beautifully. Most of the projects to date have been printed in four color process using our soy-based inks.

We have done a little bit of investigation into the adhesives, and according to the manufacturer, the material used is Low VOC and water based, and comply with CONEG regulations and the Clean Air Act of 1990. This is great news, which underscores the green printing credentials of this product.

We are stocking this recycled label paper in moderate quantities, and if demand continues to increase we will adjust our stocking quantities accordingly. Please contact us for a quote for your packaging project or mailing labels for your company collateral.

The Duke Lemur Center adopts green printing

Friday, June 12th, 2009

The Lemur Center at Duke University is a little known jewel in the Triangle. Established in 1966, the center is the world’s largest sanctuary for rare and endangered prosimian primates, including the smallest primate ever discovered. The center occupies 85 acres in Durham’s Duke Forest, and according to their website, houses roughly 250 animals, including 233 lemurs encompassing 15 species, along with lorises from India and Southeast Asia and bushbabies from Africa. The Center does not engage in any invasive or harmful testing of the animals, and focuses primarily on behavioral studies in hopes of preserving these unique creatures.

The Lemur Center’s stated mission is “to promote research and understanding of prosimians and their natural habitat as a means of advancing the frontiers of knowledge, to contribute to the educational development of future leaders in international scholarship and conservation and to enhance the human condition by stimulating intellectual growth and sustaining global biodiversity.”

Marketing Director Lari Hatley is committed to conservation of the species, and also the planet upon which they live, and therefore has made it a priority to produce all of their printed material, from brochures to newsletters, on 100% post-consumer recycled paper. To make sure the Center was getting the most eco-friendly printing, Lari got in touch with the original green printer in Raleigh, NC. We use only soy inks and water-miscible, low VOC chemistry in production. The graphics were freshened up by Raleigh designer Heath Murray.

Barefoot Press was proud to have been contracted to produce the monument signage at the facility as well. These signs are made from locally harvested pine and recycled aluminum, and for a long, fade-free life, were lettered using outdoor vinyl cut on our plotter and applied by hand.

To protect the animals, the center is open to the public by appointment only. More information on the facility and how to book a tour is available on the facility’s website.

Pittsboro Plenty gets unprecedented press

Monday, June 8th, 2009

Everyone is talking about the Pittsboro Plenty. The Plenty is a local currency project that aims to keep money in the local market in Chatham County, where I (Rich) live. The idea is that smaller economies are healthier than larger, and particularly, global ones. Headed up by Executive Director Melissa Frey, the Plenty has been revived and refreshed with backing by Capital Bank in Pittsboro, NC.

The press has gone bananas. You’ve seen the CNN story posted on our site, but that is just one of dozens of organizations covering the Plenty. Internationally, Russian, Canadian, Irish and Polish television have covered the relaunch! Here are just some of the news sources that have covered the story, and links to the media coverage are available at www.theplenty.org:

Chapel Hill News, May 27, 2009
Tulsa World (Tulsa, Oklahoma) May 17, 2009
Inside Edition (CBS) May 14, 2009
WTVD, NEWS 11, (Raleigh, Durham), May 12, 2009
News 14 Carolina, May 12, 2009
Channel One Russia, May 12, 2009
Phoenix Business Journal, May 11, 2009
RTE, (National Radio Ireland), May 10, 2009
WFMU, May 4, 2009
Polish TV, May 3, 2009
Irish Times, (Dublin), April 25, 2009
CNN, April 22, 2009
WRAL TV News, (Raleigh, Durham, Fayetteville), April 13, 2009
CFRB, (Canadian FM radio) April 11, 2009
FOX Business, April 10, 2009
Democracy Now, April 9, 2009
The Telegraph (UK), April 9, 2009
USA Today, April 5, 2009

We first printed the Plenty back in 2002. The certificates feature artwork by Bynum, NC artist Emma Skurnick. Depictions of local flora and fauna, as well as eco-friendly initiatives such as renewable energy, are backed up with a painting of an oak tree and the motto, “In each other we trust.” The original value was based on labor hours, so there were ¼, ½, 1, 5 and 10 Plenty bills. To help demystify the system of exchange, the new currency has a par value of $1, $5, $10, $20 and $50. The bills can be exchanged at Capital Bank for Federal Reserve Notes at a discounted rate of $.90 per 1 Plenty, resulting in a 10% discount on goods purchased using the Plenty. Merchants that accept the Plenty are plentiful (couldn’t help it), and include The General Store Cafe, Chatham Marketplace, Piedmont Biofuels, Chatham Wireless, and T.S. Designs.

The bills are printed in 6 colors with soy inks and water-miscible chemistry on a felt-embossed paper that contains 80% post-consumer recycled fiber. There are embossed serial numbers printed on the letterpress, and a watermark was overprinted to make the bills difficult to copy. The Plenty is, true to it’s homegrown mission, a fine example of green printing.

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